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July 15 2008

 

       

 

 

A MONTH IN NEED OF A FUN HOLIDAY

by Lourdes Stone California Correspondent

Here we are, summer in full swing, just a couple more weeks until the end of August and not a holiday in sight.

First a short history of how August came to be. Named after Gaius Julius Caesar Octaviamus aka Caesar Augustus aka Octavian, the month of Sixtillus was designated by the Roman senate as a most fortuitous month for the empire. After Octavian defeated the combined navies and armies of Marc Anthony and Cleopatra VII, he became emperor. This ended the civil war and brought Egypt under Roman rule. July, name after Julius Caesar, Octavian’s great uncle, had 31 days. So, the Roman senate added one more day to the original 30 days of the month of Sixtillus after it was renamed August to give it equal importance.

Yet, present day America has not designated an important fun day in August. January has New Year’s day which is celebrated right at the stroke of midnight. New Year’s day is actually hangover day which can be fun or not depending on how well one welcomed the beginning of the year.

February has Valentine’s day which can be fun or not depending on whether you’re the recipient or giver of dozen roses and expensive jewelry.

March has St. Paddy’s day when drinking green beer is so much fun, no argument there, even for wine and water drinkers.

April Fools’ day is followed by Cinco de Mayo. There was a ruckus at how this Mexican pseudo holiday was celebrated at a high school in my town. It had something to do with banning the US flag on that day but that is a political discussion for another day so we are not going there. There’s Mothers’ Day in May instead. A shot of tequila to all mothers young and old should do it.

Fathers’ Day in June is followed by 4th of July parades and barbecues. Weeks in July go by and a whole month of August goes by without time off before Labor Day in September comes along and school starts in earnest.

Kids and parents alike await in anticipation for Holloween in October, if they’re into that kind of thing. Then, after all the costumes are put away and before all the Halloween candies are eaten, Thanksgiving in November comes. And before all that turkey and pumpkin pie have been digested, December and Christmas is just around the corner.

But what about August? Internet search yielded the following: Colorado Day (Colorado), Tisha B’Av (Jewish), Victory Day (Rhode Island), Assumption of Mary (Christian), Statehood Day (Hawaii), Bennington Battle (2) Days (Vermont), National Aviation Day, Senior Citizens Day, and Lyndon Baines Johnson Day (Texas). How boring. August 21 - Senior Citizens Day? Arise all seniors! Let’s dance, eat and drink! Never mind shot joints, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. This is our chance to get our National Holiday; maybe not. Why not go on holiday for the whole month of August as Europeans do? Unfortunately, studies show that Americans are such workaholics; it will never work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communion on the Moon 

July 20, 1969
(This is an article by Eric Metaxas)

Forty-two years ago two human beings changed history by walking on the surface of the moon.  But what happened before Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong exited the Lunar Module (LM) is perhaps even more amazing, if only because so few people know about it.  "I'm talking about the fact that Buzz Aldrin took communion on the surface of the moon.  Some months after his return, he wrote about it in Guideposts magazine.

And a few years ago I had the privilege of meeting him myself.  I asked him about it and he confirmed the story to me, and I wrote about in my book, “Everything You Always Wanted to Know About God (But Were Afraid to Ask).”

The background to the story is that Aldrin was an elder at his Presbyterian Church in Texas during this period in his life, and knowing that he would soon be doing something unprecedented in human history, he felt he should mark the occasion somehow, and he asked his minister to help him.  And so the minister consecrated a communion wafer and a small vial of communion wine.  And Buzz Aldrin took them with him out of the Earth's orbit and on to the surface of the moon.

He and Armstrong had only been on the lunar surface for a few minutes when Aldrin made the following public statement:


"This is the LM pilot.  I'd like to take this opportunity to ask every person listening in, whoever and wherever they may be, to pause for a moment and contemplate the events of the past few hours and to give thanks in his or her own way."  

He then ended radio communication and there, on the silent surface of the moon, 250,000 miles from home, he read a verse from the Gospel of John, and he took communion.

Here is his own account of what happened:

"In the radio blackout, I opened the little plastic packages which contained the bread and the wine.  I poured the wine into the chalice our church had given me.  In the one-sixth gravity of the moon, the wine slowly curled and gracefully came up the side of the cup.  Then I read the scripture, 'I am the vine, you are the branches.  Whosoever abides in me will bring forth much fruit. Apart from me you can do nothing.’

“I had intended to read my communion passage back to earth, but at the last minute [they] had requested that I not do this."

NASA was already embroiled in a legal battle with Madelyn Murray O'Hare, the celebrated opponent of religion, over the Apollo 8 crew reading from Genesis while orbiting the moon at Christmas.  I agreed reluctantly.
“I ate the tiny Host and swallowed the wine. I gave thanks for the intelligence and spirit that had brought two young pilots to the Sea of Tranquility.  It was interesting for me to think: the very first liquid ever poured on the moon, and the very first food eaten there, were the communion elements.”

And of course, it's interesting to think that some of the first words spoken on the moon were the words of Jesus Christ, who made the Earth and the moon - and Who, in the immortal words of Dante, is Himself the "Love that moves the Sun and other stars."

How many of you knew this?  Too bad this type news doesn't travel as fast as the bad does...share it if you've felt God's Love.

                                                 
Verified on Snopes:
http://www.snopes.com/glurge/communion.asp
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Self-Healing Day

 
BY MADISYN TAYLOR      

A beautiful gift to yourself, is a day of healing and nourishing just for you.

Human beings carry within themselves the seed of healing. Our choices affect us more than we realize, and it is because of this that we tend to place responsibility for our wellness in the hands of others. As beneficial as regular visits to a healer can be, we have the power to heal ourselves at will. When we dedicate a day to the pursuit of wellness, we can relax and renew ourselves in a nourishing and comfortable environment. A sincere desire to open ourselves to the highest realities of our physical and spiritual selves is the key to self-healing so that healing energy can flow into us unimpeded. 

A self-healing day should address the vital needs of the self as a whole while directing healing energy where it is needed most. Solitude is an important part of the process as is the ability to take refuge in a space that is both beautiful and peaceful. Start your healing day by setting the intention that you are dedicating this time to healing yourself. Flowers, candlelight, incense, and music can guide our focus toward a more tranquil state. For a more intense session, try listening to music through headphones since tuning out can help you tune in. It is up to us to decide what we need to do to cultivate wellness in our lives. For some, it may be time spent in reflection. Others will turn to calming activities that help them remember their purpose, such as journal writing, being in nature, or studying. Our healing may even take a more direct form as we use color, sound, or crystals to balance and ground ourselves. 

Ultimately, your wholesome intentions transform what might otherwise be a simple day of rest into a day of healing. Grant yourself permission to relax and savor the stillness. If you attune yourself to the calm around you, worldly distractions will be minimized and the unadulterated flow of your consciousness will reestablish itself in the forefront of your mind. The needs of the body, the heart, and the soul will then be revealed to you, empowering you to tap into the essential healing energy of the universe. The mechanism you use to channel this energy will be dependent on your shifting requirements, so each day of healing you enjoy will be unique. All will replenish you, however, allowing you to recreate yourself in a perfect image of health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FROM the UK


KITCHN

Is This “American” Aisle in an English Grocery Store Actually Accurate?

by NAOMI TOMKYck)

Quick question for you: What would you consider to be “American” food? Hamburgers, hot dogs, apple pie? Or is that just the cliché answer at this point? That’s the question Twitter tried to provide insight into after Yasmine Summan posted a photo from her local Tesco in England.

 

𝖊𝖒𝖔 𝖒𝖔𝖒@YasmineSumman

Americans, I’m curious for your thoughts. This is our “American food aisle” in Tescos. Is this accurate to American food?

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8,977 people are talking about this

The photos featured popcorn, marshmallows, lots of candy — including Reese’s of many types, Hershey’s bars, and Nerds — Red Vines, beef jerky, Pepperidge Farm cookies, Snyder’s pretzels, Libby’s Pumpkin, and, most controversially, hot dogs in a jar.

The main issue many respondents had with the pictures was that it was all junk food, but given that it’s a shelf in a store across the water, it makes sense they’re not selling Georgia peaches or Indiana corn. What doesn’t make sense, though, is the hot dogs in a jar.

Ironically, the original poster came to the defense of the clear glass full of sausages, tagging in the store for help: “@Tesco everyone is freaking out about hot dogs in a jar can you please tell them this is like totally normal and I’m not crazy???” she requested. 

 

View image on Twitter

𝖊𝖒𝖔 𝖒𝖔𝖒@YasmineSumman

@Tesco everyone is freaking out about hot dogs in a jar can you please tell them this is like totally normal and I’m not crazy???

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289 people are talking about this

Apparently, what we learn from this photo is that the American section of the British store might just be a little more British than it seemed at first glance. In fact, tube meats afloat in liquid didn’t raise questions, but a few other American foods did mystify — and, reading her questions, I’m rethinking them myself: “I love that everyone has an issue with the hot dogs in a jar but not like BEEF jerky?? (I don’t understand what that is and I’m honestly scared?? What- where is the beef from?? How do they make it jerky??) Steak sauce?? Marshmallow in a jar??”I’m afraid I can’t even help with her final request in that post, “America, Explain.”

𝖊𝖒𝖔 𝖒𝖔𝖒@YasmineSumman

 · 

𝖊𝖒𝖔 𝖒𝖔𝖒@YasmineSumman

I love that everyone has an issue with the hot dogs in a jar but not like BEEF jerky?? (I don’t understand what that is and I’m honestly scared?? What- where is the beef from?? How do they make it jerky??) Steak sauce?? Marshmallow in a jar??

America expLAIN

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522 people are talking about this

So, what do you think of the “American” grocery aisle? Does it seem accurate to you or just… wrong?

PUBLISHED: JUL 8, 2019

Quick question for you: What would you consider to be “American” food? Hamburgers, hot dogs, apple pie? Or is that just the cliché answer at this point? That’s the question Twitter tried to provide insight into after Yasmine Summan posted a photo from her local Tesco in England.

The photos featured popcorn, marshmallows, lots of candy — including Reese’s of many types, Hershey’s bars, and Nerds — Red Vines, beef jerky, Pepperidge Farm cookies, Snyder’s pretzels, Libby’s Pumpkin, and, most controversially, hot dogs in a jar.

The main issue many respondents had with the pictures was that it was all junk food, but given that it’s a shelf in a store across the water, it makes sense they’re not selling Georgia peaches or Indiana corn. What doesn’t make sense, though, is the hot dogs in a jar.

Ironically, the original poster came to the defense of the clear glass full of sausages, tagging in the store for help: “@Tesco everyone is freaking out about hot dogs in a jar can you please tell them this is like totally normal and I’m not crazy???” she requested. 

 · 

Americans, I’m curious for your thoughts. This is our “American food aisle” in Tescos. Is this accurate to American food

289 people are talking about this

Apparently, what we learn from this photo is that the American section of the British store might just be a little more British than it seemed at first glance. In fact, tube meats afloat in liquid didn’t raise questions, but a few other American foods did mystify — and, reading her questions, I’m rethinking them myself: “I love that everyone has an issue with the hot dogs in a jar but not like BEEF jerky?? (I don’t understand what that is and I’m honestly scared?? What- where is the beef from?? How do they make it jerky??) Steak sauce?? Marshmallow in a jar??”I’m afraid I can’t even help with her final request in that post, “America, Explain.”

𝖊𝖒𝖔 𝖒𝖔𝖒@YasmineSumman

I love that everyone has an issue with the hot dogs in a jar but not like BEEF jerky?? (I don’t understand what that is and I’m honestly scared?? What- where is the beef from?? How do they make it jerky??) Steak sauce?? Marshmallow in a jar??

 

522 people are talking about this

So, what do you think of the “American” grocery aisle? Does it seem accurate to you or just… wrong?

PUBLISHED: JUL 8, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s why these vets are turning to yoga

 
There are multiple nonprofits designed specifically to help veterans looking for a more peaceful way to work through their problems.(Getty Images)

 

By:     May 31

Rolf Gates is keenly aware that he doesn’t fit the profile of your typical yoga enthusiast.

“How many African-American males do you think there are in the yoga space?” he said. “I’m like the Lone Ranger.”

Gates is a former Army infantry lieutenant who went through Ranger school during his eight years in the military. Thanks to a combination of grit, yoga and his Army training, he was able to overcome addiction and post-traumatic stress in his civilian life. Gates is now a full-time yoga teacher and the author of three yoga and meditation books.

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He is one of many veterans who have taken advantage of yoga as a technique to calm inner turmoil and as an alternative to destructive forms of self-medicating. In fact, there are multiple nonprofits designed specifically to help veterans looking for a more peaceful way to work through their problems.

For example, the nonprofit Yoga For Vets serves as an international database for veterans interested in finding yoga classes tailored to their needs wherever they may live.

“The idea is that when you’re working with this type of population … it creates a space of peace and comfort,” said Randy Hamlin, Yoga For Vets’ president and CEO. “That’s the first go-around, when you’re involved with something and you’re not freaking out.”

 

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Hamlin is a Vietnam veteran who served in the Marines from 1966-74. He said that in his experience as a yoga teacher, he has seen veterans gain the confidence to cut back on or go off their prescribed medications entirely because of how yoga quelled their inner demons.

“I think yoga is a beginning aspect of creating balance in your life. It’s a foundation for it,” he said.

That was Gates’ experience with yoga. Doctors told him that his blood pressure was dangerously high, most likely due to complications stemming from his PTSD.

Now, at 55 years old, Gates said he no longer has blood-pressure issues and has also been sober 29 years at least partially thanks to the mental and physical relief provided by yoga.

“You physically learn how to calm down,” he said. “They teach you how to relax your body, slow and deepen your breathing, to be less and less disturbed when you’re disturbed because you learn to take care of yourself.”

 

Yoga also was crucial for former Marine Cpl. Jason Davey as he dealt with mental anguish that arose years after he exited the military. Luckily for him, he already had a yoga routine in place and was able to find the inner strength to keep his anxiety attacks at bay.

Davey has been practicing yoga for almost four years and teaching it for more than two years. He works with nonprofit Connected Warriors that makes sure veterans have access to cheap or even free yoga classes, and he also started his own nonprofit called Nola Seva dedicated to that goal in the New Orleans area.

“Ultimately, the idea is to create a space where the veteran can be more mindful of the present without being on edge,” Davey said.

Former Marine Cpl. Jason Davey has been practicing yoga for almost four years and teaching it for more than two years. Having a yoga routine in place helped him find the inner strength to keep his anxiety attacks at bay. (Photo provided by Jason Davey)

Former Marine Cpl. Jason Davey has been practicing yoga for almost four years and teaching it for more than two years. Having a yoga routine in place helped him find the inner strength to keep his anxiety attacks at bay. (Photo provided by Jason Davey)

All three of these veterans want to dispel the notion that practicing yoga somehow makes you less masculine.

“It’s about showing all the veterans out there that this isn’t just something for soccer moms ages 18-25,” Davey said. “There’s a perception among veterans groups that this is a women’s-only exercise, and it’s just not that. It’s a healing modality that requires effort on the service member’s part.”

Hamlin admitted that he also used to think yoga was “for girls,” but quickly opened his mind when he realized how much good it was doing for him.

“You start to look at things differently,” Hamlin said. “When you actually take the time to practice once or twice a week, it actually changes you. Your awareness level is a lot different. That’s been a big benefit.”

Gates had a lot more at stake with yoga than just personal betterment. He believes that his commitment to yoga has helped him be a more “calm, reasonable parent” to his 16-year-old daughter and 13-year-old son.

In Gates’ experience, male veterans are more likely to use yoga as a healing tool in cities than in rural areas. He challenged his fellow veterans regardless of race, gender or location to check out yoga and be the leaders the military taught them to be in terms of evangelizing its potential benefits for others.

“When I went to Ranger school, they told me Rangers lead the way,” Gates said. “Why would you be afraid of leading the way? Be one of the first men to show up to this class. Don’t be a wuss.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Valley Natural Solutions Logo

Low-Dose Aspirin to Prevent Heart Disease – A Waste of Time?

A nationwide survey of people aged 45 to 75 found almost half the respondents were taking aspirin to ward off heart problems, even though they had no history of cardiovascular disease.

Vast numbers of doctors still urge this strategy on their patients. And after all, who wouldn’t want to lower their risk of the nation’s biggest killer with a cheap, low-dose remedy, free of any noticeable side effects?

But other doctors say this is a bad idea. They argue the benefits — if any — are outweighed by the risks, which include a higher risk of death.

This debate among medical professionals has been going on for years, but now a major new trial may finally put an end to this argument once and for all. . .

Who’s Right?

When eminent physicians line up on opposite sides, it leaves lay people puzzled and confused. Who should they listen to?

Peter Elwood, Honorary Professor of Medicine at Cardiff University, Wales, describes aspirin as a “miracle drug” that will slash heart attack risk by 30% and save lives. True, there’s an increased risk of hemorrhage, but he argues that this bleeding isn’t fatal.

Meanwhile Peter Sever, Professor of Clinical Pharmacology at Imperial College London, maintains any benefit for those who have no history of heart disease is tiny, and is offset by a much bigger risk of severe, potentially life-threatening bleeds in the digestive tract and the brain.

Researchers from the US and Australia hoped to nail down the final answer to this debate with a trial of 19,114 men and women over the age of 65. All were free of heart disease, dementia or physical disability at the start of the study.

Half took 100 mg of aspirin daily while the other half swallowed a placebo. The trial lasted 4¾ years. The researchers just published their findings as three separate papers in the New England Journal of Medicine.

No Benefit for Healthy Older People

First, they looked at disability-free survival – a composite of death, dementia and chronic physical disability. The purpose was to see whether taking aspirin led to enjoying longer health, fitness, independence and lifespan.

The answer was no, it had no effect. However, there was a 38 percent increased rate of major hemorrhage in the aspirin group.

Next they looked at the rate of cardiovascular disease. Here again they found aspirin did not significantly lower the risk.

The final outcome measure was all-cause mortality – i.e. how many deaths occurred regardless of cause. During the follow up there were 1,052 deaths. The risk of death was 14 percent higher in the aspirin group.

The main reason for this outcome was a 31 percent increase in death from cancer. This came as a surprise because other studies show aspirin reduces the risk. The authors said this finding should be “interpreted with caution.”

The lead author, Professor John McNeil from Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, said, “It means millions of healthy older people…who are taking low dose aspirin without a medical reason, may be doing so unnecessarily because the study showed no overall benefit to offset the bleeding.”

Medics Agree: “Don’t Do It”

Many experts were asked to comment on the study:

In the opinion of Stephen Evans, Professor of Pharmacoepidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, ” …benefits of aspirin in healthy people are at best limited, and [it] may well be harmful, and this harm may be increased beyond age 73.”

Jane Armitage, MD, Professor of Clinical Trials and Epidemiology at the University of Oxford, remarked, “In parts of the world — in the US and also I think in Australia — there’s quite high usage of aspirin in [preventing heart disease]. I think people need to think very hard about whether or not that’s a good thing.”

And Dr. Kausik Ray, consultant cardiologist at Imperial College London, took a hard line: “…aspirin does not have a place in the routine use for primary prevention…”

John Cleland, also from Imperial added, “It’s certainly a very interesting result — a significant increase in cancer, a significant increase in all-cause mortality, a significant increase in bleeding, so it looks like the recommendation for aspirin is: don’t do it.”

Vincent Bufalino, MD, Medical Director of the Advocate Heart Institute, Naperville, Illinois, threw in his pennyworth: “I, in my personal practice, have been stopping my seniors who are all taking aspirin because, good-naturedly, they all assume that it’s helping prolong their life or improve their life.

“[This study] reinforces for us that people who do not have heart disease do not need aspirin.”

My take: I’ve opposed the aspirin-a-day nonsense for decades. The reasons are obvious and have been known all along: It can lead to bleeding of brain and GI tract. The purpose of the aspirin is to reduce inflammation and thin the blood (to avoid clotting that can cause heart attacks and strokes.)

But there are countless natural anti-inflammatories and blood thinners that do not carry any risks and are good for you. Proteolytic enzymes like bromelain come to mind.


  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25891049
  2. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1800722?query=featured_home
  3. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1805819?query=featured_home
  4. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1803955?query=featured_home
  5. https://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/news/20180916/study-doubts-worth-of-daily-aspirin-for-seniors#1

By |October 7th, 2018|Lifestyle|0 Comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are Filipinos Asian, Hispanic, or Pacific Islander?

 

 

 

 

 

History of the Philippines in 8 minutes 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

the piano guys are back

 

 

  

AVATAR

                                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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